Book Readings

Vision Australia Radio offers a range of book readings from novels, biographies, history – and the odd curiosity:

 

  • Something Novel - Novels, Monday to Friday 4:30pm
  • Book at Bedtime – Novels, Monday to Friday 10:00pm
  • People of Note – Biographies (and Autobiographies), Monday to Friday 10:30pm
  • Stories of our Lives – History, Sunday 7:00pm
  • Sunday Book at Bedtime – various genres, Sunday 10:00pm

We welcome your suggestions and feedback


Something Novel - Novels, Monday to Friday 4:00pm

Currently on Something Novel: Rain Music by Di Morrissey.
 

From goodreads.com:

Di writes about the Australia she knows, she loves, she's explored.

Rain Music is inspired by her adventures in far north Queensland - its characters, its forgotten history, its modern dilemmas.

A brother and sister, Ned and Bella Chisholm, are struggling with a family tragedy that has set them on opposite paths. After Ned takes off to pursue his musical dreams in far north Queensland, he disappears. When Bella goes in search of her brother, she ends up in remote Cooktown and both their lives are dramatically changed in the isolated, little-known far north of Australia.

One story through two sets of eyes.


Book at Bedtime – Novels, Monday to Friday 10:00pm

Currently on Book at Bedtime: Charpe's Rifles by Bernard Cornwell.

From goodreads.com:

Bernard Cornwell's action-packed series that captures the gritty texture of Napoleonic warfare--now beautifully repackagedIt's 1809, and Napoleon's army is sweeping across Spain. Lieutenant Richard Sharpe is newly in command of the demoralized, distrustful men of the 95th Rifles. He must lead them to safety--and the only way of escape is a treacherous trek through the enemy-infested mountains of Spain.


People of Note – Biographies (and Autobiographies), Monday to Friday 10:30pm

Currently on People of Note: Talking To My Country by Stan Grant

From goodreads.com:

An extraordinarily powerful and personal meditation on race, culture and national identity.

In July 2015, as the debate over Adam Goodes being booed at AFL games raged and got ever more heated and ugly, Stan Grant wrote a short but powerful piece for The Guardian that went viral, not only in Australia but right around the world, shared over 100,000 times on social media. His was a personal, passionate and powerful response to racism in Australian and the sorrow, shame, anger and hardship of being an indigenous man. 'We are the detritus of the brutality of the Australian frontier', he wrote, 'We remained a reminder of what was lost, what was taken, what was destroyed to scaffold the building of this nation's prosperity.'

Stan Grant was lucky enough to find an escape route, making his way through education to become one of our leading journalists. He also spent many years outside Australia, working in Asia, the Middle East, Europe and Africa, a time that liberated him and gave him a unique perspective on Australia. This is his very personal meditation on what it means to be Australian, what it means to be indigenous, and what racism really means in this country.


Stories of our Lives – History, Sunday 7:00pm

Currently on Stories Of Our Lives: Charles Dickens by Claire Tomalin.


From goodreads.com:

Charles Dickens: A Life gives full measure to Dickens's heroic stature-his huge virtues both as a writer and as a human being- while observing his failings in both respects with an unblinking eye. Renowned literary biographer Claire Tomalin crafts a story worthy of Dickens's own pen, a comedy that turns to tragedy as the very qualities that made him great-his indomitable energy, boldness, imagination, and showmanship-finally destroyed him. The man who emerges is one of extraordinary contradictions, whose vices and virtues were intertwined as surely as his life and his art.

Sunday Book at Bedtime – various genres, Sunday 10:00pm

Currently on Sunday Book at Bedtime: The Passage of Love by Alex Miller.

From goodreads.com:

Critically acclaimed, two-time winner of the Miles Franklin award, winner of the Commonwealth Writers Prize and numerous other literary awards, Miller's new work is an exquisitely personal novel of love and creativity. 

Sitting in a New York park, an old man holds a book and tries to accept that his contribution to the future is over. Instead, he remembers a youthful yearning for open horizons, for Australia, a yearning he now knows inspired his life as a writer. Instinctively he picks up his pen and starts at the beginning...

At twenty-one years, Robert Crofts leaves his broken dreams in Far North Queensland, finally stopping in Melbourne almost destitute. It's there he begins to understand how books and writing might be the saving of him. They will be how he leaves his mark on the world. He also begins to understand how many obstacles there will be to thwart his ambition.

When Robert is introduced to Lena Soren, beautiful, rich and educated, his life takes a very different path. But in the intimacy of their connection lies an unknowability that both torments and tantalises as Robert and Lena long for something that neither can provide for the other.

In a rich blend of thoughtful and beautifully observed writing, the lives of a husband and wife are laid bare in their passionate struggle to engage with their individual creativity.

Alex Miller is magnificent in this most personal of all novels filled with rare wisdom and incisive observation.

Summary
Vision Australia Radio offers a range of book readings from novels, biographies, history – and the odd curiosity: